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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)
francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are us
the adoption of our technology across the different leagues. we have customers on very industries, banking industry jumped in first. it is primary around the security of our platform. their need was to get confidential board material out to their board members on ipads is ideally the way to do it because it is easy and safe. the i.t. costs are low. they couldn't find a better solution out there. >> have you a function if i'm a coach i know that my running back looked at the play. i push out a play -- that is the funny thing. we think of nfl players as being of course they read all the plays. they are like any other employee. they read about half the manual. >> you said that. there are a lot of big brother capabilities that we can enable. we haven't done so until we are requested to do so and for really productive reasons. football has a few days to study what they need to study. it gets to be an extreme in other sports when they are traveling. to take information learned in one evening and by the next night how do you get the changes is a bigger problem that we saw. >> i talked to some pla
, again, as technology develops, if the court continues down the path of sitting there are some searches that, a detect contraband and are not searches at all, the encroachments on our privacy are going to increase ever further as technology moves on. >> i was a little puzzled as to what the florida supreme court really meant -- really wanted in the harris case. it is not just enough to say the dog has been certified, you need more performance evidence. how would that work? every time there is a case where drug evidence is used, the prosecution would have to come and and a show, what, there is some sort of test? he has gone out 100 times -- what would be the evidence that would be enough to convince a judge this dog was reliable? what's the traditional test for probable cause is the totality of the circumstances. i think the state is advocating, if a police officer gets on the stand and says this dog is trained, that should be enough. we are arguing, no, no one should look at the totality of circumstances. there cannot be a prescribed checklist that needs to be checked off. something mor
. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting because of tech. i mean, today apple's literally announcing the next iphone. that's cool, but that's just the most obvious example of things that continue to move at astonishing speed, and there's developments literally everywhere you look. and we don't think leaders generally get that. so i'm going to give you a couple of little, quick housekeeping things that we need to know. for one thing, there is an app, te space detroit, so look that up and download it, it has all the program. it'll be in realtime all day, please use the app, detroit labs made it, it's very good. te detroit is the way to get it up on the itunes store. everything here's on the record. we're really into q&a and hearing your voice from the audience. almost every session we will have you guys up here. you don't have to just ask a question, you can make a comment, but keep it brief. we're videoing and live streaming eve
, there's the windows 8 products, the tablet, the pc running win does 8, and you got a lot of technology enthusists itching to get hands op these things. you have samsung with the galaxy s3. you got folks over at amazon doing exciting things so this is a great time. neil: they all can't make money on it; right? i mean, just going to be for the technology sphere or hanging too much, and are we saying, all rit, well, there's no way they can do it. there's an economic poll. the fiscal cliff, people are not going to be as confident and rebust about buying stuff, and the tech guys prove us wrong. >> well, you don't know, neil. we can sit here and postulate what the futures are, but one thing we know for certain is you can hardly find a more exciting time relative to the technology tools so that's nothing but good news. take t typical window users focusing more onbusiness than social networks. now they can use nose spread @%eets and word documents on their tablet as well as their pc with the smart phones coming along, running windows 8 operating system. hey, that's exciting. neil: just because
or six years. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think academia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con g
which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50s arm every day. -- 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. the king collect information. -- they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. a convicted on facebook. -- you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. publicly it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. read it carefully, it will be here next year. -- hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program a
training techniques, new learning technologies that are helping them to deal with these potential threats which i think is giving them more and more confidence. >> when you look at what -- there are anny nor mouse number of lessons that were learned in these. we're already transition away to operations other than counter insurgency operations. at the same time the national security strategy says we have to preserve some of those skills. how do you preserve these skills that are very experienced based, over the long term, so that if we find ourselves in a situation five, sir, seven, eight years from now, whether you're active guard and reserves you are going to have the skill set necessary? >> so this week we just finished publishing brand-new doctrine. we published all of the army doctrine which is the foundation of how we train and how we resource and so we've published -- we're redoing counter insurgency. we're looking at stability operations, which is kind of what we're talking about as we transition from counter insurgency to stability. we're incorporating the lessons learned into our
. that bringing you better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. >> millions of americans struggling to get by, and voices shouldn't be drown out by millions of dollars in secret adrtising. as the election approaches, it's not just a theory. we can see how druttive to the democracy this becomes. damaging the democracy. those in washington a long time are not always happy with me. they talk about me like a dog. neil: he's been barking about this special interest cash for a long time, but also taking a big bite out of it. we learned the obama campaign raisedded a billion dollars. wow. that does not include $64 # million from the very outside groups the president likes to smack around. the romney camp r
invested in our information management systems. a lot of mobility technologies being rolled out across our organization we want to take that investment and leverage it across that network. they have over 200 locations, 4300 employees, this will wring our total work force up to 14,000 employees. we're really going to be able to have a lot more scale. we believe we really can drive margin improvement across their business. when you look at this business back in the late '90s, very successful business. it went through some real difficult times. but through those difficulties, they have a real strong brand. we're going to maintain that safety clean brand. we're going to maintain that network of the branches they have. and that will be a network. we can leverage and bring other services to their customers, particularly clean harbor's field services businesses, which is part of our emergency response business, as we talked about earlier. >> now, the conference call was interesting in that everyone seems really excited about the re-refining but there was some chatter about how the parts cleaning
cbs 5 forecast. >> thank you. >>> dna technology that can catch metal thieves. how it works and why it's not being used in the bay area. >> the jersey shore in ruins from sandy. a look at the catastrophe, the clean-up and why storm victims are turning on each other. ,, ,, ,,,,,,,, owner in san francisco. some und bronze >>> thomas the hippopotamus is in pieces but finally back with its owner in san francisco. somebody stole the statue in sutro heights four years ago. today police returned it to the rightful owner. >> i knew he would come back. i just knew it. i just felt that, first of all, nobody would say that it's scrap metal. >> now, if the thief had sold the statue to metal recyclers, that person could probably get a few hundred dollars for it. police found the hippo during a drug bust friday, made an arrest. the owner plans to weld thomas back together. >>> for years now we have told you about the rash of metal thefts just like that one and how much it ends up costing bay area cities utilities people. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a metal thief redhanded. cbs 5
the mayor came to us with a very precise question which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. this is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. he will be joined by a bunch of other panelists for how far can innovations take our cities. >> thanks. while they get ready, i
can't have the boom and the bust. thenwhere it went big and then it was destroyed and then technology jobs went overseas. it's difficult to think about that and the repercussion when we could have a much more orderly transfer. but not the boom and bust. >> gavin: assume that president obama is re-elected. what should he think about going into the new year, taking the baton of sandy and new consciousness that hopefully is iowaawakened. what should be the top priority going into the second term? >> the top priority is talking again. your point was i think it was a good one that you started out with, no one is talking about. neither candidate is talking about it. we can't expect the american public to get on board if the leaders aren't talking about this. one thing that everyone is clear on, we will have storms of more intensity because of global warming. we will have more storms like this in the future because of global warming. one thing we have to do is start talking about it. second we really double down on theonthe innovation agenda. the president did a good job speaking about the s
changed over the last 20 or 30 years. technology has made us more productive but it has also made a lot of good jobs obsolete. mobil trade brought us cheaper products but it also means jobs overseas in low-wage countries. american workers saw their paychecks getting squeezed. even when corporate profits rose and ceo salaries exploded. guaranteed pensions and health care starting to erode or disappear altogether. the rise of global competition, those are real. we can't wish them away. here is what i know. and we can meet those challenges. we are americans. we have the world's best entrepreneurs, and tests, researchers, colleges, universities. we have the most innovative workers. we have everything we need to thrive in this new economy. there is not a country on earth that would not gladly trade places with the united states. to secure a future that we want for our kids and our grandkids, we have to make a choice right now. in five days, we will choose our next president. [applause] and, boulder, it is more than just a choice between two candidates or parties. you will be making a choice
the sensata technologies plant to protest plans to move the factory to china, ending 170 jobs. a federal appeals court has rejected the group plan. his challenge of a funding ban in taxes. texas has sought to cut payments to planned parenthood and exclude it from a government funded health program for low- income women because it also provides abortions. the texas program offers cancer and health screenings as well as birth control to some 100,000 low-income women, about 40,000 of whom are served through planned parenthood. the court of appeals for the but circuit in new orleans declined to reconsider an earlier ruling upholding the ban. in response, texas governor rick perry immediately announced that texas will stop all payments to program participants affiliated with abortion providers. a recent george washington university study has warned texas will be unlikely to provide adequate care to the patients currently served by planned parenthood. the supreme court is set to decide today on whether to hear a challenge to the conviction of five former top officials with the holy land founda
quarter, the most significant area of growth in ohio is investment technology. i.p. we have groan financial services. we have grown health care. look, there's been significant investment by auto companies in ohio. they are reducing their footprint. i wish we could get more here. i just met with the delphi team trying to get more business there. but, i mean, let's be fair about this. the fact is, the bureau of labor statistics said when you take everything into account, companies and suppliers we are up 400 jobs. we did not grow by relying on one industry or one sector. we have done it by diversifying ohio and making it safe for people to come in here. i called ceos in other states and they are interested in what we are doing here. there are no surprises coming. when there are no surprises, investors and business people, job creators think it's safe to go there. the proof is in the pudding. >> let me ask you about unemployment. whoever is responsible for the success in ohio, governor romney doesn't seem impressed. this is what he said speaking earlier this month to the columbia dis
technologies like clean energy and fuel efficient cars. we know that our country is stronger when we can count on affordable health insurance and medicare and social security. when we protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution. when there are rules in place to make sure we're not taking advantage of by credit card companies or mortgage lenders or unscrupulous financial institutions. we know we're better off when politicians in washington aren't allowed to make decisions about health care that women are perfectly capable of making for themselves. that's what we believe. that's the vision that we embrace. i appreciate that. governor romney now, he's got an entirely different view about what this country is about. don't boo. vote. vote. he's been running around saying he's got a five-point plan for the economy. turns out it's a one-point plan. those at the top get to play by a different set of rules than you do. they get to pay lower tax rates. outsource jobs, they want to let wall street run wild, make reckless bets with other folks' money. that was the philosophy as ceo, as gover
that technology, let's say, a bunch of people going to a best buy and more inclined to buy products like this, is there a spillover affect in i think it's generally limit today that sphere and doesn't mean people buy more sweaters or-- >> i think it's very much limited to that sphere, but i think to your basic point, the energy initiative, creativity of people in the private sector who stand to make a great deal of money and prestige by creating something new, useful, wonderful, good looking and the computer wars, that's an overwelcoming incente which the ordinary bureaucrat doesn't have. it's a shame and it would be nice if the bureaucrats could be incentivized in some way, but to te the minds of the person out of that, and compare it with the person out of commerce. >> apple-- >> i'm trying to think who was more offensive of my basic line of thinking. i think that ben was more in line until that zinger at the end and drew me in and says, okay, here. but go ahead. >> but apple, steve jobs defined the new apple by deciding what we needed and wanted before we even knew it. and tha was going on
of that technology. i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden. i want to underscore the same point that the president made. i supported his action there. i felt the same as the president did. >> i think romney is leaning obama. >> it did not last long? >> we haven't heard an agenda for the president. >> team obama knows full steam ahead. the president went on a two-day battleground blitz this week or, as he calls it -- >> our 48-hour fly around campaign marathon extravaganza. >> speaking of extravaganza, did you hear about donald trump's big, huge, mega game changing bombshell announcement of president obama? yeah, neither did we. he did come out with this -- >> if barack obama opens up and gives his college records and applications and if he gives his passport applications -- >> you get the point. but the president got the last laugh. >> this all dates back to when we were growing up together in kenya. >> and from big hair to big bird. >> i'm glad to be the way i am. >> the halloween costume is already sold out this year with one man to thank. >> i like pbs, i love big bird. >> an
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let
technology is here to explain. even when they say it's not it is always about money messa: so first let's take a look at the day's maet headlines. a rough-and-tumble week for stocks ending a on a quiet note. better than expected u.s. third quarter gdp data could knot offset worries about corporate earnings the dow eked out a gain of three points. good year was one of the biggest losers wi shares tumbling more than 10%. the tire-maker missed third quarter estimates driven by weakness in europe. one bright spot was expedia. shar soared 15%. they posted strong third quarter earnings fueled by a sharp rise in hotel bookings. >>> now to our top story. some people are calling it "frankenstorm". others call it a nor'easter-cane combination hurricane, nor'easter snowstorm or nightmare. if you live on the east coast you call it scary. hurricane sandy is making its way up the eastern seaboard. it may hit critical refineries that process 3.1 million barrels of oil per day. you know what that means. gas prices could go right back up. patrick dehaan from gasbuddy.com joins me with more on this one.
there are concerns about safety, safety of the vehicle. there are a lot of things we do in technology to ensure the vehicles can't be stolen if they are broken into. but i really do see that members of these communities also see some of the benefits that these cars bring to them. they kind of watch out. it's almost like the neighborhood watch thing. this car is here, it's serving a purpose. i'm a member, i use it day to day. the car has really become part of the neighborhood. >> um-hm, okay. thank you very much. >>> sure. >>> i did want to say i'm looking at the material. thank you for putting this together. it looks like there are five u.s. cities, three canadian cities, and i think it's brilliant, this model of one-way vehicle * . i was going to ask about your vehicle fleet. it looks like you have globally 5,000 vehicles, 625 are electric. i'm just wondering do you use the smart cars or what kind of vehicles do you use? and i also see that san francisco, based on your market research, is almost like a perfect city to operate in given the density and many, many people that don't have cars. but
with the technology before it's as secure as it probably should be. charlie has given some terrific talks about the incentive structures for software makers and whether or not they're properly in balance to make sure that they're secure with their software before they release it. but i'll let him speak for himself on that. >> host: well, mr. miller, if you would speak to that. >> guest: sure. so we're in a situation where we all run code that was written by a vendor like microsoft or apple or cisco or whoever. um, and the problem is it's very difficult to write secure code, code that's perfect with no vulnerabilities. and it's hard to measure whether a code is secure. so even an expert like myself, it's very difficult for me to tell you whether if given two programs, which one is more secure than the other. so it's hard to measure, and people don't want to necessarily pay for that. so we all want to buy the latest gadget, the latest iphone or whatever, and we don't really think to ourself how secure is it? maybe i shouldn't buy it because it's not secure. so companies, you know, they're out to
percent. energy falling 1.7%. and technology down 1.5% falling commodity prices weighed on some of their respective stock sectors. oil fell more than two dollars per barrel, settling at its lowest price since june. the u.s. dollar was higher on the back of the employment numbers and a more expensive dollar can put downward pressure on oil. oil giant chevron also hurt the energy sector and the dow. chevron had the biggest percentage loss among dow stocks. chevron did not make as much money has anticipated in the third quarter. earnings per share were well short of estimates. similar to exxon mobil, chevron also saw its production and fuel sales fall, hit by hurricane isaac in august, legal troubles in braziand a refiry fire in california. shares fell 2.8%, closing at their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i
of the wto and it is the creation of the wto and it is in part because of technology. you had this per septible takeoff with respect to their relationship to the global economy of not just china but indca and parts of latin america and certainly eastern europe. you saw this all over the world. >> this would be reflected in the proportion of sales derived from overseas. the rapidly -- >> yes. >> steepning of that curve. >> so what difference should that make? well, it's to me part of it is -- part of it reflects yes outsourcing of jobs from the united states and from other advanced economies. and that has an income and jobs hit. but to me, the larger effect is for a second i tried to think like a microeconomist. this is globalization is actually about the creation of tens and tens of thousands of new businesses who are competing with businesses usually in their own home market. so chinese companies competing with u.s. companies in the chinese market. or in asian markets where china's exporting to. and also, the united states our companies competing more with european companies in chines
that technology was invented by somebody and it was invented by scientists that put together an idea and figured out how to make it work. >> that's true. we see innovation as the practical expression of imagination where you turn ideas into reality. and we're all about that here at the tech museum of innovation. >> what are some of the other exhibits? >> well, if you come to the tech museum you may want to get tickets to "mythbusters" an amazing exhibit. you can see the blueprints and if you get more wet whether you walk on run through the rain. you can play with react table where you move blocks around to may musical compositions and come down to our hands on on science workshop and build your own plane. >> that's one of the really neat things down here is not just sitting here in a class and learning about science but you get to do some real hands on stuff so you can understand how things work. >> it's true. you know, bay area science festival is all about unleashing your inyour scientists and tech museum. we want to help unleash your inner science. >> reporter: totally for geeks like me but i
information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani talking on taxes, health care, energy. he's introduced by tom donohue. >> if i could have your attention, pl
much" series. watch on c-span2. >> now a conference from detroit focusing on technology and entrepreneurship in u.s. urban areas throughout the country. it was a conference in mid september at wayne state university. this part of the conference's two hours. >> i'm going to turn it over to you. >> rock on. >> thank you for getting us started and thank you for being here. it is exciting to finally have this thing under way. we have been working on it for an awfully long time. what we do is up to now, a retreat-like invitation only leaders thing in the desert and we really wanted to get our message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. i hope that is what you will be hearing throughout the day today. the messages at this event are focused on four issues -- u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is tied to the first to, and the revival of our cities with detroit as a case study #one. we're very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great ci
? >> spotty. the technology we had internet service problems but the exchange has been unbelievable with their support. we were here early and they got us up and running. we're here as a physical presence. we're ready. >> you have hand helds. data feeds are working for hand helds. >> absolutely. that's one thing we nailed down to make sure we can get orders. the specialists are ready at the post ready to trade and open stocks a the 9:30. >> you have cell phones that you communicate with offices and sometimes when needed with clients. that's very spotty right now. two of the big downtown stations for verizon have been damaged. what are they doing to make sure that's working? >> they're working around the clock. they are going to try to get that open today. we have other ways to getting on this thing. creative ways down here, believe me. we can figure it out. >> neil, thank you very much. one of the things they have done here that's very creative is they have raised the threshold for the auto execution for the designated market makers. these are guys that used to be called specialist.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 499 (some duplicates have been removed)

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